Theme songs, Ally McBeal, and how (maybe) to get your NaNoWriMo mojo back

There's something SO fun about the scene above. In the story, our weird little lawyer fellow (John Cage) is having trouble getting himself psyched up for a case. He is suddenly overcome by his theme song...and there he is, ready to win. One of the charming things in the show Ally McBeal was the thought…

Alexa? Shaddup!!!

Way back before Apple took over automobiles, I had a Ford Focus that linked to my phone in the old primitive way. The sport version car was a spiffy two door, surprisingly cool, with exciting computery things on the dash, heated seats, the works. I would dress up and try to gather approving glances as…

Sheree Fitch and the loss of a child

Sheree Fitch, that author of giggling rhymes and wiggling toes and monkeys in the kitchen, to say nothing of her joyful new book on Summer Feet, has taken the daring step of revealing what it is like to lose an adult son. I heard Sheree being interviewed on CBC's Information Morning this morning, and she…

NaNoWriNot, or can I parenthesis you to death?

Well. I mean, sheesh. Here I get all het up and ready to write for NaNoWriMo, and THINGS keep happening to me. Many are self-inflicted (changing medications, etc, resulting in the spinnies, very distracting), some are other-inflicted (I'm looking at you, LH, and that deadly upper respiratory infection) and some are weather-inflicted. It's been raining…

Reading for Writers: The Writing Life by Annie Dillard

Lightning Droplets

Chapter 1.1

In her first chapter of The Writing Life, Annie Dillard begins to explain the complexities of writing.  She hones in on the process.  She starts with the importance of the word as a tool, a hammer, a pick, that gets to the root of the gold you are searching, plumbing depths and getting you closer to truth.  But she also asserts the need to know that many of your words will need to be scrapped, thrown away for the good of a piece.

This first chapter is a perfect example of sparseness that works.  Dillard moves back and forth between musing about writing and metaphors for writing.  For example, she tells of the inch worm that is constantly searching climbing a blade, “in constant panic” (7).  When putting forth her metaphors, she does not fumble with explication or transitions. Instead she boldly throws the metaphor out juxtaposed…

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Should I? Shouldn’t I? Or taking the plunge and probably being scandalous…

  I am having that weird butterfly in the stomach feeling that you get when you are teetering on the edge of something, getting ready to jump. It's about my book, of course. That one I've been working on for years. Part of a trilogy of novellas that I need a spiffy title for, like "The…

Remembrance Day, or how I am always twisted between honouring service and hating the glorification of war..

My father and all his brothers and all my mother's brothers served in WW2.  They survived the first bit, but so many of them later died from cancer - probably related to their service. One of my uncles and HIS father were prisoners of war for a long deadly time. I never ever want to…

Am I a ‘wrinkly’? Or why is it I can’t understand this computer thingie?

I'm beginning to dread that I may, in fact, be evolving into that senior stereotype. I've got the grey hair, and now that I've lost some weight I seem to be showing wrinkles. (and wattles!!!ugh!) I like to think I am more computer-savvy than many of my age. I use computer things a lot. I…

Happy November!

I'm watching an incredible windstorm slap leaves into building walls. The harbour is filled with whitecaps and I haven't seen the ferry in some time. Only seagulls are daring the wind - the other birds have gone into hiding, and I can't blame them. It's oddly warm for November, fooling the cat, who wants to…

Help! My brain is exploding!!

Argh. Way back when MS ate my brain, I grieved hugely for the cognitive loss. "Never mind," said my boss at the time, "now we'll be able to keep up with you!" Cognitive screening showed I still had good capacity, as long as I wasn't asked to do anything for more than TWENTY MINUTES! Freaked…